Have daniel radcliffe and emma watson dating

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There have been a couple who burst into tears when they met me. Apparently Emma Watson used to fancy you – was this a surprise?No, because she’d said it before a few years ago on TV.They've developed a great repoire over the years and know how to play to the larger audience. This film is much darker, but also the funniest of the series.How much time did you spend working on the balance between drama and the comedy? I think if Hermione kept going at the rate she was going, in terms of the amounts of worrying she was doing, she might've developed a haemorrhage. Having some more of that I think actually heightened the pathos at the end where Dumbledore died.I knew everyone on Harry Potter, so Planet Of The Apes was outside my comfort zone. I had to have a US accent and the character’s even more villainous than Draco – so I had to step it up a bit. A lot of child actors end up on the scrapheap – are you worried?Were you concerned about signing up for another franchise? It’s a hard industry to have a long career regardless of what films you’ve been in but fingers crossed I can continue in it.You balance the dramatic stuff as well, but the scene on the broomstick in quidditch is something like Buster Keaton. So it was fun to explore a bit deeper and make him more fundamentally three dimensionally.Bonnie Wright: I think you got to more sort of look out with your character that comes.

It's now 10 years down the line from when Daniel made that fateful decision, and we can't imagine anyone else playing the bespectacled wizard.

"Luckily for Potter fans, Radcliffe, who was just 14 at the time, decided to stay playing Harry for the next five films - because he'd miss his cast-mates, and because he realised just how good a role it was for him at the time, adding, "Actually there aren't many great parts out there for teenage boys, certainly not as good as Harry Potter".

Despite that blip during his career as a boy wizard, Daniel insists that he no longer resents the role that made him famous - describing it as a "very cool thing that did wonders for the British film industry", despite the fact "you might not always be happy with the work you did on it".

He said: "I need to make myself as viable a choice for any part as I possibly can.":: The full interview appears in the August issue of Esquire magazine, on sale Monday July 6.

The Big Short, the film adaptation of Michael Lewis' book of the same name about the causes of the financial crisis, opens in UK cinemas this weekend.

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